Archive for the ‘coat color genes’ Category

13 June: International Albinism Awareness Day

Saturday, June 13th, 2015
13 June: International Albinism Awareness Day

13 June: International Albinism Awareness Day

People with albinism are visually handicapped and show variable alterations in pigmentation. In our first world, people with albinism can protect their skin from the sun rays, with sun creams, hats and adequate clothes. Unfortunately, in Africa, where usually sunscreens and protective clothes are not universally available, people with albinism suffer from sunburns that often develop into skin tumours and eventually to death, if not treated and removed in time. This is terrible and absolutely unnecessary and could be easily prevented, as it already happens in the first world, where people with albinism can protect their skins from sunlight and can receive support for their visual impairment, which constitutes their most important problem in their everyday’s life.
Furthermore, in some countries in Africa, people with albinism are kidnapped, hunted, killed and cut into pieces, aberrantly and stupidly used in magic rituals associated to a profound ignorance and lack of humane culture, which should be banned, prosecuted, condemned and erradicated.
Today, as the International Albinism Awareness Day, from the International Federation of Pigment Cell Societies, we would wholeheartedly appreciate if everyone of you could dedicate at least some minutes to think about the situation and problems affecting people with albinism all over the world. Joining or supporting any of the many campaigns launched today by the associations in support of people with albinism could be a fantastic first step!.
… and many more associations and initiatives in support of people with albinism!
The ESPCR supports a conference on oculocutaneous albinism in sub-saharian Africa, which will be held in Douala, Cameroon, on 24-25 July, promoted by Prof. Robert Aquaron (Honorary member of ESPCR) and Prof. Albert Mouelle (Cameroon), where a number of IFPCS members will be there presenting our research projects and scientific progress aiming to better understand albinism.
Thanks for joining and spreading the word!.

New types of oculocutaneous albinism

Saturday, September 28th, 2013
New types of oculocutaneous albinism. Pictures taken from figures published in Montoliu et al. (Pigment Cell & Melanoma Res., 2013 Sep 21. doi: 10.1111/pcmr.12167). Top panel: OCA5 subjects; Middle panel: OCA6 subjects; Bottom panel: OCA7 subjects.

New types of oculocutaneous albinism. Pictures taken from figures published in Montoliu et al. (Pigment Cell & Melanoma Res., 2013 Sep 21. doi: 10.1111/pcmr.12167). Top panel: OCA5 subjects; Middle panel: OCA6 subjects; Bottom panel: OCA7 subjects.

Three new types of oculocutaneous albinism have been reported recently. OCA5 was first described by Zubair Ahmed’s lab in a Pakistani family and has been associated with a region within human chromosome 4 (4q24). OCA6 was first described by Wei Li’s lab in a Chinese family and is associated with mutations in the SLC24A5 gene. OCA7 was first described by Karen Gronskov and Thomas Rosenberg’s labs in a Denish family and is associated with mutations in the C10orf11 gene. These three new types of oculocutaneous albinism have been discussed in a collaborative review just published online in Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research:

Montoliu L, Grønskov K, Wei AH, Martínez-García M, Fernández A, Arveiler B, Morice-Picard F, Riazuddin S, Suzuki T, Ahmed ZM, Rosenberg T, Li W.
  • 4q24 ==> OCA5
  • SLC24A5 ==> OCA6
  • C10orf11 ==> OCA7

Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research 26:2 (March 2013 issue)

Thursday, March 7th, 2013
Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research 26:2 (March 2013 issue)

Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research 26:2 (March 2013 issue)

Pigment Cell Development Workshop, 6-8 May 2013, Edinburgh, UK

Saturday, November 24th, 2012
Pigment Cell Development Workshop, 6-8 May 2013, Edinburgh, UK

Pigment Cell Development Workshop, 6-8 May 2013, Edinburgh, UK

Welcome to the Pigment Cell Developmental Biology Workshop 2013! The 2013 Pigment Cell Developmental Biology Workshop is an opportunity for international researchers to meet and discuss the latest and best research on the development of the pigment cell in all species. The meeting will consist of a series of research talks selected from the abstracts and poster presentations, as well as keynote speakers. We are delighted that we will have two outstanding keynote speakers: Greg Barsh (Stanford and HudsonAlpha) and Emi Nishimura (Toyko Medical and Dental University). The meeting will take place at the ancient University of Edinburgh, nestled under the dramatic hills of Arthur’s seat and the Royal Holyrood Park.

As pigment cell biology is important to the hair and skin, the meeting has been timed to be between the 7th World Hair Congress (4-6 May 2013, Edinburgh, UK) and the International Investigative Dermatology Meeting (8-11 May 2013, Edinburgh, UK). This will certainly provide an opportunity for participants at both conferences to attend and interact with the Developmental Biology Group.

The Pigment Cell Developmental Biology Workshop 2013 is sponsored by the European Society for Pigment Cell Research (ESPCR), Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research (PCMR) and the Medical Research Council, Human Genetics Unit (MRC-HGU).

The Pigment Cell Developmental Biology Workshop is the 2013 meeting of the IFPCS Group-of-Interest on “Pigment Cell Development”, co-chaired by Bill Pavan, Robert Kelsh and Hiroaki Yamamoto.

Looking forward to welcoming you to Edinburgh!

Organizers of the Pigment Cell Developmental Biology Workshop 2013

Liz Patton: e.patton@igmm.ed.ac.uk

Ian Jackson: ian.jackson@igmm.ed.ac.uk

MRC Human Genetics Unit

MRC IGMM, University of Edinburgh,

Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU

T: +44 (0)131 332 2471  •  F: +44 (0)131 467 8456

www.hgu.mrc.ac.uk  •   www.igmm.ac.uk

IFPCS Forum

Sunday, February 15th, 2009
IFPCS Forum

IFPCS Forum

The IFPCS Forum has been created within the members-only section of the IFPCS web site. There, all IFPCS Members are most welcome to contribute with their posts and replies to any topic related to Pigment Cell Research, our Society and its activities (Pigment Cell Societies’ annual meetings, International Pigment Cell Conferences, etc…).  If you are a member of IFPCS, please visit the IFPCS Forum and give it a try.

Color Genes WEB

Tuesday, September 9th, 2008
Color Genes WEB

Color Genes WEB

The WEB page that contains the most updated information about COLOR GENES has changed its name to better reflect the wide variety of loci involved in pigmentation, including some that do not affect or involve coat color. Therefore, the old name of “Coat Color Genes” has been updated to COLOR GENES. This WEB page is available from the ESPCR WEB site.

Coat Color Genes WEB updated

Sunday, August 10th, 2008
Coat Color Genes WEB
Coat Color Genes WEB

The Coat Color Genes WEB has been updated. 79 new loci have been added as cloned and uncloned pigmentary genes. This site, hosted at the ESPCR WEB, now holds information of 210 genes that are directly or indirectly related to pigmentation, and also includes up to 84 mouse pictures, generously contributed by several ESPCR members and colleagues, illustrating the phenotype of some of these mutations.

This WEB is maintained by Lluis Montoliu and Dot Bennett and it is actively being updated with additional loci involved in pigmentation. If you are interested in coat color genes we suggest you to visit regularly the coat color genes web site and look for the most updated information. If you have any suggestion, comment, contribution, correction, idea, request, etc… regarding the coat color genes web please forward your message to: micemut@espcr.org
Thanks for your collaboration!

This blog is protected by Dave\'s Spam Karma 2: 33037 Spams eaten and counting...